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WE KNOW OUR AREA BEST

Our many years of experience and our strategic position means that not only do we have a strong presence in Wentworthville and the surrounding areas, but we also now cover a much wider area.
Just click on any suburb covered by this map and we’ll give you a quick ‘snapshot’ of the area, property prices and the local features and attractions.
Blacktown
Area Profile

Blacktown is bounded by Richmond Road, the western boundary of the Ashlar Golf Club, Breakfast Creek, Sunnyholt Road and Vardys Road in the north, the suburb of Lalor Park, Stephen Street, the suburb of Seven Hills, Blacktown Creek, Blacktown Road and Roger Place in the east, generally by Lorne Street, Wye Street, Flushcombe Road, the Great Western Highway, the Western Motorway, Reservoir Road, Holbeche Road and Bungarribee Creek in the south and generally by Douglas Road, Tallawong Avenue, a line running continuous of Tallawong Avenue, Lynwood Avenue, Clarence Street and McClean Street in the west.

Blacktown is an established mixed use area, with industrial areas in the north and south, commercial areas in the centre and substantial residential and institutional areas.

The real estate in Blacktown consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of units, villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

History

Blacktown was originally named for an Aboriginal settlement in the area. Settlement of the area dates from 1802, with land used mainly for farming. Growth was minimal until the 1860s, aided by the construction of the railway line. Expansion took place in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The most significant development occurred in the post-war years, particularly during the 1950s and 1960s. The population has increased slightly from the 1990s, a result of new dwellings being added to the area.

Suburb Features

Major features of the area include Westpoint Blacktown (Shopping Centre), Blacktown Mega Centre, Council offices, Blacktown District Hospital, Ashlar Golf Club, Blacktown Arts Centre, Blacktown Swimming Pool, Blacktown Showground, Alpha Park, Francis Park, International Peace Park, Lynwood Park, TAFE NSW Western Sydney Institute (Blacktown College), Patrician Brothers College.

Transport

Access into and out of Blacktown is provided by the transport links including the Western railway line between Sydney, Penrith and Richmond; the Great Western Highway, Richmond Road; plus the M2, M4, and M7 Motorways. There are 1,019 km of local roads and 100 km of Regional roads within Blacktown.

The Blacktown railway station is an interconnecting station for the Countrylink services between country terminal in the Sydney CBD.It is also a bus interchange utilised by Westbus and Busways transport operators providing connection to local suburbs not directly linked by rail.

These private bus companies offer interconnection services between many of the railway stations within the City of Blacktown and beyond, extending the reach of public transport along the main road corridors of the Great Western Highway, Prospect Highway, Richmond Road, Windsor Road and other major roads throughout the area.

Cycling is being increasingly catered for throughout the city. The council has a published map showing over 65 km of existing cycleway (including some cycleways on shared roads), however there are extensive biking and walking tracks which are not included on that map.

Blacktown City Council proposes that by December 2006 there will be 125 km of cycleways assisting in providing safe bicycle access throughout the city. This does not include recreational cycleways such as those in the various parks and gardens throughout the area.

 

Statistics

The size of Blacktown is approximately 16 km². 

It has 52 parks, 16 schools and 11 childcare centres.

The population of Blacktown in 2006 was 39,586.
In 2006, 63% of the homes in Blacktown were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $375,000.

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Constitution Hill
Area Profile
Constitution Hill is located 28 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Parramatta and is part of the Greater Western Sydney region.
It overlooks the city of Parramatta from above and contains views of the inner Sydney city skyline.
Parts of the Constitution Hill area, was previously known as the suburb – Wentworthville and Old Toongabbie.

The suburb name was changed to Constitution Hill in 2007.

The real estate in Constitution Hill consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

Transport

Constitution Hill has a great bus service with T-way bus service to Parramatta. Also only a few minutes drive to Wentworthville Railway station.

Statistics

The size of Constitution Hill is approximately 2 km². 

It has 8 parks and one school located within its boundaries.

The population of Constitution Hill is roughly 5,036 households.
In 2006, 59% of the homes in Constitution Hill area were owner-occupied compared.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $515,000.


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Girraween
Area Profile

Development as an independent suburb began in 1910 when land was subdivided and sold by real estate developer Arthur Rickard. The initial lots sold rapidly, some were later sold at much higher prices. Girraween was originally a street name in that subdivision, which had been named Toongabbie Park, but when the post office opened, it took the name of Girraween, which also became the suburb's name.
The School of Arts was founded in 1918 and it played an important part in the social life of Girraween. The Anglican and Catholic Churches held their first services in it. Girraween School also held their first classes there.
Girraween is serviced by buses that connect it to other local areas. There is no railway station although it is a short walk through Civic Park, to Pendle Hill railway station.

The real estate in Girraween consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

History

The name Girraween is an Aboriginal word for "the place where flowers grow". Girraween first became settled in the early 1900's. Prior to that the area formed part of what was known as Major Wentworth's Farm. Dr. D'Arcy Wentworth arrived as the surgeon on the Second Fleet convict transport "Neptune" in 1790 and was one of the early settlers. He received land grants amounting to 2,750 acres which extended over most of Toongabbie, Girraween, Pendle Hill, Wentworthville and some of Greystanes.

Transport
Girraween is serviced by the Hills Bus 705 bus route from Toongabbie to Parramatta. There is no railway station although it is a short walk through Civic Park, to Pendle Hill railway station and also within easy walking distance to Toongabbie Railway station.
Schools
Girraween ‘Selective’ High School and Girraween Public School
Statistics

The size of Girraween is approximately 2 km². 

It has 6 parks and three 3 schools and 1 childcare centre.

The population is around 4,062 households.
In 2006, 67% of the homes in Girraween were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $480,500.


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Greystanes
Area Profile

Greystanes is located 29 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Holroyd.
The real estate in Greystanes consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
In the early years of British settlement the area was known as Prospect Hill and was the site of the first land grants to emancipated convicts in 1791. At this period it was one of several areas of conflict between the indigenous Dharug people and the settlers, the Dharug being led for many years of guerrilla warfare by Pemulwuy.
The area later became differentiated into Prospect, to the west of Greystanes Creek, and Greystanes to the east of the Creek, the latter taking its name from a historical home on Prospect Hill, built by Nelson Simmons Lawson, third child of Lieutenant William Lawson. The name 'Grey Stanes', given by Nelson Lawson, came from the outcrops of basalt on Prospect Hill, "Grey" being its colour and "Stanes" being the Scottish word for stones.
The land was originally granted to William Cummings in 1799, before being acquired by William Lawson in approximately 1810. It was from this land that William Lawson, Gregory Blaxland and William Charles Wentworth set out on their successful crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813 and discovered the Bathurst Plains. The Lawson family crypt still exists today at St Bartholomew's Church, Prospect.
Poultry farming became important in the early twentieth century until Greystanes developed in the 1950s and 1960s as a residential suburb.

General Information
The major arterial roads include Cumberland Highway, Great Western Highway and M4 Western Motorway. Greystanes is serviced by Westbus with the train stations at Parramatta and Merrylands.
It is also indirectly serviced by the Parramatta-Liverpool T-Way which runs through Smithfield and Wetherill Park, to the south.
Transport
The major arterial roads include Cumberland Highway, Great Western Highway and M4 Western Motorway. Greystanes is serviced by Westbus' routes 806, 809, 810, 811, and 818 which connect Greystanes and Pemulwuy with the train stations at Parramatta and Merrylands.
Schools

Primary schools
• Greystanes Public School
• Beresford Road Primary School
• Ringrose Primary School
• Widemere Public School

Statistics

The size of Greystanes is approximately 9 km². 

It has 37 parks, 8 schools and 4 childcare centres.

The population of Greystanes in 2006 the population was 20,141.
In 2006, 81% of the homes in Greystanes were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $479,000.

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Granville
Area Profile
Granville, is a suburb in western Sydney, Australia. Granville is located 22 kilometres (14 mi) west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Parramatta. A small part in the north-west is located in the Local Government Area of the City of Holroyd.
South Granville is a separate suburb with the distinguishing feature of a light industrial area. Lisgar, Redfern, Heath and Mona Streets form the approximate border between Granville and South Granville. The Duck River provides a boundary with Auburn, to the east.
The real estate in Granville consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level units, villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.
History
The area evolved primarily after 1855, when it became the final stop of the first railway line of New South Wales. The Sydney-Parramatta Line ran from Sydney terminus, just south from today's Central railway station to the Granville area which was originally known as 'Parramatta Junction'. This led to the development of this area, which attracted speculators and some local industries.
In the early days of European settlement, timber was harvested to fuel the steam engines in Sydney and Parramatta. By the 1860s, the supply of timber was exhausted. The remainder was used by scavengers who made a living by collecting firewood. Wattle bark found use with tanners and the bark from stringybark trees was used for roofing of huts, In 1862, a major estate, Drainville, became subject to a mortgagee sale and subdivided for villa homes, and small agricultures. At the end of the decade a Tweed Mill was established, which was steam powered using water from the Duck River.
In 1878, the locality received its own post office, which was then part of the stationmasters house. In 1880 Parramatta Junction was renamed to Granville, after the British Colonial Secretary, Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville. The place then had a population of 372, of which 176 were male and 196 female. In this era some German settlers, Joseph Klein and P W Merkell, tried to establish vineyards in the area, but eventually found the land was not suited for this type of agriculture. More farmers discovered the limitations of the local soils and fruit growers complained about the damage from flying foxes. Thus, the only practical use for the grasslands, which replaced the original bushland, was for dairy cattle.
The Granville Municipality was formed in 1885 and the council carried on the local government of the area until 1948, when it became part of an enlarged City of Parramatta.
Developments
Granville has a mixture of residential, commercial and industrial developments. The commercial and residential developments are mostly around Granville railway station and Parramatta Road. Granville is primarily dominated by freestanding weatherboard, fibro and unrendered brick buildings. The area is no longer exactly "typical" quarter acre block territory, but 500 to 600 m2 (0.12 to 0.15 acre) blocks are reasonably common. Terraced houses are rare, but increasing in number. Apartment blocks, generally three to four storeys in height, are also becoming more common in the vicinity of the railway station.
Transport
Granville railway station is a major station on the South line and Western line of the CityRail network. It is also an inter-city stop on the Blue Mountains Line.
Education
Granville has a major college of Technical and Further Education, which is part of the South Western Sydney Institute of TAFE. Schools include Granville Boys High School which was founded in 1926, Granville Public School, Granville East Public School, Blaxcell Street Public School and Holy Family Catholic School. The suburb is also home to a branch of the Parramatta City Library.
Statistics

The size of Granville is approximately 7 km². 

It has 14 parks covering nearly 6%, 9 schools and 7 childcare centres located in Granville.

The population was 12,109 showing a population.
In 2006, 49% of the homes in Granville were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $455,000.

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Guildford
Area Profile

Guildford is located 24 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Fairfield and is part of the Greater Western Sydney region. Old Guildford and Guildford were named after the Earl of Guildford.

The real estate in Guildford consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
Prior to colonisation, the Dharug people (Aboriginees) lived in small groups across the Cumberland Plain, including in the area which is now the Woodville Ward.The Bidjigal clan lived around the area which is now Guildford.
Lieutenant Samuel North was granted 640 acres (2.6 km2) here on 1837 and named his property Guildford, as he had ties with the Earl of Guildford. Although the name of the property changed to Orchardleigh in 1843 when it was sold by North, the name Guildford stuck to the region and the small hamlet which developed in the area around Woodville Road. In 1869 a school had opened and a church was built in the 1880s.
In 1876, a railway station was built on the line some distance to the north of the village and named Guildford because it was the closest settlement to the station. The settlement that grew up around the railway station became larger than the original village and ultimately took over the name Guildford with the former settlement becoming known as Old Guildford.
Transport
Guildford railway station is on the South railway line of the CityRail network.
Statistics

According to the 2006 Australian Census, Old Guildford had a population of 2272 people with a very substantial Arabic speaking population (38%). The majority of the suburb's residents were Australian born with the next most common place of birth being Lebanon (13%) followed by Vietnam (3.6%), China (2.3%) and Syria (1.6%). Old Guildford had a higher than average number of families with children (56%).
The size of Guildford is approximately 3 km². 

It has 8 parks and 2 schools located in Guildford.

The population of Guildford in 2006 was 17,214.
In 2006, 58% of the homes in Guildford were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $450,000.

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Harris Park
Area Profile

Harris Park is extremely close to the Parramatta CBD, offering easy access Westfield shoppingtown and Parramatta station. Harris Park also has a railway station of its own which is on the Western line of the CityRail network. Real Estate types are a combination of heritage style character homes or one of the conveniently located home units available for sale or rent in the area.
History
James Ruse was the first convict to be granted land in the colony, by Governor Arthur Phillip in this area in 1791. He developed Australia's first private farm known as Experiment Farm, which sowed the first wheat in Australia. Surgeon John Harris, who had already received land grants in the area in 1793 and 1805, bought the farm and built a cottage on the site in c1795. Harris Park is named after John Harris.
Transport
Harris park has a railway station and also great bus service.
Statistics

Harris Park is located 23 kilometres west of the Sydney CBD district and is in the local government area of the ‘City of Parramatta’.
The size of Harris Park is approximately 2 km². 

It has 4 parks, 4 schools and 2 childcare centres.

In the 2006 Census there were 6,854 persons in Harris Park.
In 2006, 28% of the homes in Harris Park were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $600,000.
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Holroyd
Area Profile

The suburb of Holroyd was created when suburb boundaries had to be defined and Holroyd Council Local Government Area did not have a suburb of the same name and had to create one to satisfy the State Government requirements as carried out by the Geographical Names Board. It was gazetted in 1999 with boundaries being: Walpole Street (north), Neil Street (south) the railway line (east) and Pitt Street (west). There was a change to the boundary in 2001 with the northern boundary extended to the freeway.
The real estate in Holroyd consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
Arthur Todd Holroyd (1806-1887) acquired land in this area in 1855. His property, Sherwood Scrubs, was located in Merrylands named after his former home in England.
Arthur Todd Holroyd MP (Bathurst Plains then Parramatta) was a judge for the NSW Supreme Court, had completed one year medical residency in London and was a keen businessman. He was respected and powerful and was on many and varied boards and committees. He became the first mayor of Holroyd Council (then Municipality of Prospect & Sherwood 1872-1927 with only 250 ratepayers for first 9 years) and made clay pipes for drainage at Sherwood Scrubs and introduced drainage to the local area. He also encouraged the rail line to Parramatta Junction.
Landmarks- Brickworks apartments
This historic Goodlet and Smith Brickpit sites have now been redeveloped into Holroyd Gardens Park (on the site of a clay pit that was later filled) and Holroyd Gardens Estate which is a medium density development that includes the remaining heritage brickwork kilns and associated buildings.
The real estate in Holroyd consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. Holroyd real estate has a combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. The real estate in  some of Holroyd areas has seen a number of homes parcelled together to create small real estate development sites for the construction of villa and town house sites plus a number of larger real estate home sites created for a combination of both villas and townhouses.  

Transport
Although Holroyd does not have a railway station it is onl a short drive to close Merrylands railway station and has a great bus service.

Statistics
Holroyd is located 24 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Holroyd. The administrative centre is located in nearby Merrylands.
The size of Holroyd is approximately 1 km². 
It has 2 parks covering nearly 25% of the total area. 
The population of Holroyd in 2006 was 243 and 65% were owner-occupied
Currently the median sale price of houses in the area is $500,000.

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Lalor Park
Area Profile
Lalor Park is located 35 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Blacktown. Lalor Park is part of the Greater Western Sydney region.
The real estate in Lalor Park consists of a combination of single level homes and single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes.
Although the suburb is primarily residential there is a significant retail shopping precinct with about thirty shops including a newsagents, pharmacy and a small supermarket located at the junction of Northcott Road and Freeman Street.
History
Lalor Park takes its name from the Lalor family, who owned property in the area. Two members of the family (George and Robert) were Councillors on Blacktown Shire Council, George serving as Shire President on two occasions, 1921-1923 and 1928.
 Education
Lalor Park is the location of a number of educational institutions including:
• Lalor Park Preschool - A community based preschool
• Lalor Park Public School - K-6 public primary school founded in 1959
• St Bernadette's Primary - systemic Catholic K-6 Primary School founded 1960 by the Sisters of St Joseph

Transport
Although Lalor Park does not have a railway station it is onl a short drive to close Seven Hills railway station and has a great bus service.

Statistics

The size of Lalor Park is approximately 3 km². 

It has 16 parks, 3 schools and 2 childcare centres.
 
The population of Lalor Park in 2006 the population was 7,172.
In 2006, 61% of the homes in Lalor Park were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $360,000.


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Merrylands
Area Profile


Merrylands was named after the former English home of Arthur Todd Holroyd (1806–1887), who acquired land in this area in 1855. The local government area that Merrylands is part of is named after him.

Merrylands has a commercial area around Merrylands railway station. Stockland Mall is a shopping centre with supermarkets, discount department stores and specialty shops. Merrylands railway station is on the South Line of the CityRail network.
Slightly over half of Merrylands' population are foreign-born, with Lebanon being the highest of any single country (8.45%) and 49.3% of residents being born in Australia. Merrylands is made up of a large community with people from Italian, Lebanese, African and Assyrian background, with the majority being of Christian faith.
The real estate in Merrylands consist of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

The real estate in  some of Merrylands areas has seen a number of homes parcelled together to create small real estate development sites for the construction of villa and town house sites plus a number of larger real estate sites created for a combination of both villas and townhouses.  

Transport
The Merrylands railway station is on the South Line of the CityRail network. There is also a great bus service to Parramatta.

Statistics

The size of Merrylands is approximately 6 km². 

It has 13 parks, 7 schools and 7 childcare centre..

The population of Merrylands in 2006 was 24,679.
In 2006, 56% of the homes in Merrylands were owner-occupied. 

Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of real estate houses in the Merrylands area is $480,000.
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Northmead
Area Profile

Northmead is a hilly, low to medium density suburb of houses, townhouses and apartment buildings framed on its eastern edge by natural bushland. It is divided under the jurisdictions of both Baulkham Hills Shire Council and Parramatta City Council.
The real estate in Northmead consist of a combination of single level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of beautiful older weatherboard and full brick homes that have been restored to their former glory.

History
With the British settlement of Parramatta, this area was originally part of the domain of Government House. What is left of this domain, including Government House, forms Parramatta Park. The name Northmead is derived from the location of the north "mead", or meadow, of the governor's domain.
The land was subdivided between 1859 and 1889 and the Northern Meadow and Western Meadow of the domain were split off and called Northmead and Westmead. From this time, orchards were established by many new settlers, including some whose names were well-known in the Parramatta area - George Oakes, Nat Payten and William Fullagar among them.

Shopping

Shopping in Northmead is provided at the town centre by an open-air shopping centre with shops surrounding a car park. Alternative shopping is provided by nearby North Parramatta, Parramatta, Winston Hills, Baulkham Hills and Castle Hill, which are all within 10mins drive.

Transport

Northmead is located adjacent to James Ruse Drive also known as The Cumberland Highway allowing resident's access to Sydney CBD and Outer Western Sydney. The M2 Motorway is also within close proximity, providing residents with a more express route to Sydney CBD. Buses provide public transport to, from and throughout the area, with the nearest train station situated in nearby Parramatta.

Schools
Residents have a choice of schools in Northmead or alternatively they can take advantage of the schools located in adjacent suburbs.

Statistics
Northmead is located 26 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government areas of the City of Parramatta and The Hills Shire. Northmead is part of the Greater Western Sydney region.
The size of Northmead is approximately 26 km². 

It has 7 parks, 3 schools and 3 childcare centres located in Northmead.

The population of Northmead in 2006 was 7,584.
In 2006, 69% of the homes in Northmead were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $680,000.

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North Parramatta
Area Profile
North Parramatta is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. North Parramatta is located 24 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Parramatta. Parramatta is a separate suburb to the south.
North Parramatta is adjacent to Parramatta and borders the Hills District area. It covers both Parramatta and Baulkham Hills jurisdictions. The area comprises quality apartments, townhouses, villa homes & many brick, timber & fibro dwellings. The famous Kings School, Lake Parramatta and a small Industrial area comprise almost 50% of the land area.
History
The Darug people had lived in the area for many generations, and regarded the area as a food bowl, rich in food from the river and forests. They called the area Baramada or Burramatta ('Parramatta') which means "the place where the eels lie down.
Transport
Although North Parramtta does not have a railway station it is only a few minutes deive to Parramatta station. Newly introduced to Parramatta and North Parramatta is 'the loop', a free bus service. The Loop travels from the Parramatta CBD (shops, station etc) up to North Parramatta, and continues to loop this route each day. This service has proven to be a winner, especially for people residing in North Parramatta who can easily reach the station and Westfield shoppingtown.
Statistics

The size of North Parramatta is approximately 4 km². 

It has 6 parks, 5 schools and 5 childcare centres located in North Parramatta.

The population of North Parramatta in 2006 was 8,241.
In 2006, 42% of the homes in North Parramatta were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $547,500.

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Old Toongabbie
Area Profile

Old Toongabbie is located 29 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, is only about  3.5 kilometres northwest of Parramatta CBD and in the local government area of the City of Parramatta.
The real estate in Old Toongabbie consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

History
Old Toongabbie is noted for being the third settlement set up after the British occupation of Australia began in 1788. It was founded as a Government Farm to grow food for the colony in April 1792. After eleven years, the government farm was closed and the land was given as grants to settlers and convicts who had done their time.
In 1860, the railway was extended to Blacktown but it took 20 years before any arrangements were made for trains to stop at Toongabbie. The first school in Toongabbie, opened on the 3rd of May 1886. By April 1911, the school closed due to low enrolments. The school reopened February the next year and has stayed open ever since.
The first post office in the area was opened after many years of campaigning by local residents in 1887 in a private house on Old Windsor Road and this arrangement continued until the 1960s. The first post master was a Mr Birks wand he was paid 25 pounds a year to manage the office and bring the mail bag over from Seven Hills on horseback each day. By 1922 the number of residents and businesses had grown sufficiently to support a second office in a weatherboard cottage in Wentworth Avenue, known as Toongabbie West. A purpose built office was opened in the main shopping area in Portico Parade in 1960 becoming Toongabbie Post Office whilst the old Toongabbie Post Office was renamed Old Toongabbie.
The suburb straddles busy Old Windsor Road, effectively creating two different areas. Both are dominated by single dwellings from the 1950s and 60s, though there is a small new development in the suburb's east that is still being established.
From the 1990s part of this area was unofficially known as the locality of Constitution Hill. The suburb of Constitution Hill was officially recognised in 2007.
Transport
Old Toongabbie has a great bus service with T-way bus service to Parramatta. Also only a few minutes drive to Toongabbie or Wentworthville Railway station.

Statistics

The size of Old Toongabbie is approximately 2 km². 

It has 1 park, 1 school and 1 childcare centre.

The population of Old Toongabbie in 2006 was 2,466.
In 2006, 88% of the homes in Old Toongabbie were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $475,000.

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Parramatta
Area Profile

Parramatta is a suburb and major urban centre of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is located in Greater Western Sydney 23 kilometres (14 mi) west of the Sydney central business district on the banks of the Parramatta River. It is known colloquially as 'Parra'.
Parramatta is the administrative seat of the Local Government Area (LGA) of the City of Parramatta. Part of the suburb is shared with the City of Holroyd LGA. It is a major urban centre of New South Wales; the economic capital of Greater Western Sydney; and the sixth largest central business district in Australia. The central business district of Parramatta is approximately at the geographical centre of its urban area.
Since 2000, Parramatta has seen the consolidation of its role as a government centre with the relocation of agencies such as the New South Wales Police Force headquarters and Sydney Water, from the Sydney CBD. Simultaneously, major upgrades have occurred around the railway station with the expansion of Westfield Parramatta, the creation of a new transport interchange, and the ongoing development of the Civic Place local government precinct.
The suburb of Parramatta offers an extensive mix of high-rise apartments, heritage buildings, terrace/town homes, new & older style brick homes and weatherboard homes. It is within close proximity to over 140 restaurants, cafes and food outlets. There are 48 public and private primary and secondary schools in Parramatta as well as a wide range of specialist colleges and even a university. You will also find a range of fitness centres, sports grounds and golf courses as well as the Historic Parramatta Park.
History
The Darug people had lived in the area for many generations, and regarded the area as rich in food from the river and forests. They called the area Baramada or Burramatta ('Parramatta') which means "head of water”or "the place where the eels lie down. To this day there is a plenitude of eels and other sea creatures attracted to the profusion of nutrients created by the saltwater of Port Jackson meeting the freshwater of the Parramatta River's catchment. The eel has been adopted as the symbol of the Parramatta Eels Rugby League club.
European settlement
Parramatta was founded in 1788, the same year as Sydney. The British Colony, which had arrived in January 1788 in the First Fleet at Sydney Cove, had only enough food to support itself for a short time and the soil around Sydney Cove proved too poor to grow the amount of food that 1,000 convicts, soldiers and administrators needed to survive. During 1788, Governor Arthur Phillip had reconnoitred several places before choosing Parramatta as the most likely place for a successful large farm.[16] Parramatta was the furthest navigable point inland on the Parramatta River (i.e. furthest from the thin, sandy coastal soil) and also the point at which the river became freshwater and therefore useful for farming.
On Sunday 2 November 1788, Governor Phillip took a detachment of marines along with a surveyor and, in boats, made his way upriver to a location that he called The Crescent, a defensible hill curved round a river bend, now in Parramatta Park. As a settlement developed, Governor Phillip gave it the name "Rose Hill" (now used for a nearby suburb) which in 1791 he changed to Parramatta, approximating the term used by the local Aboriginal people.
In an attempt to deal with the food crisis, Phillip in 1789 granted a convict named James Ruse the land of Experiment Farm at Parramatta on the condition that he develop a viable agriculture. There Ruse became the first person to successfully grow grain in Australia. The Parramatta area was also the site of John Macarthur's pioneering of the Australian wool industry at Elizabeth Farm in the 1790s.
Governor Arthur Phillip built a small house for himself on the hill of The Crescent. In 1799 this was replaced by a larger residence which, substantially improved by Governor Lachlan Macquarie from 1815 to 1818, has survived to the present day, used as a retreat by Governors until the 1850s with one Governor (Governor Brisbane) making it his principal home for a short period in the 1820s. The house, Old Government House, is currently a historic site and museum within Parramatta Park and is Australia's oldest surviving public building.
In 1803, a famous incident occurred in Parramatta, involving a convicted criminal named Joseph Samuel, originally from England. Samuel was convicted of murder and sentenced to death by hanging, but the rope broke. In the second attempt, the noose slipped off his neck. In the third attempt, the new rope broke. Governor Phillip was summoned and pardoned Samuel, as the incident appeared to him to be divine intervention.
Parramatta has many buildings on the Register of the National Estate, including: Elizabeth Farm House, Experiment Farm Cottage, Lancer Barracks, Parramatta Town Hall, the former Post Office in Church Street, Centennial Clock, Lennox Bridge, St John's Cathedral, St John's Cemetery, St Patrick's Cathedral, Parochial School in Elizabeth Street, Arthur Phillip High School,[18] Brislington in Marsden Street, Hambledon in Hassall Street, former King's School Group, Roman Catholic Cemetery in North Parramatta, Parramatta Psychiatric Centre, Parramatta Park, All Saints Church Group (Source: The Heritage of Australia, Macmillan Company, 1981)
Transport
Parramatta railway station is a major transport interchange on the CityRail network. It is served by the Blue Mountains line, Cumberland line and the Western line. The station was originally opened on 4 July 1860 five years after the first railway line in Sydney was opened in 1855, running from Sydney to Parramatta Junction. It was recently upgraded, with work beginning in late 2003 and the new interchange opening on 19 February 2006.
The Parramatta ferry wharf is at the Charles Street Weir, which divides the tidal saltwater from the freshwater of the upper river, on the eastern boundary of the Central Business District. The wharf is the westernmost destination of the Sydney Ferries River Cat ferry service which runs on Parramatta River.[24]
The Great Western Highway and Parramatta Road have always been important roads for Parramatta and Greater Sydney. The M4 Western Motorway has taken much of the traffic away from these roads, with entrance and exit ramps close to Parramatta.
Parramatta is serviced by Hillsbus which provides services along the North West T-way to Rouse Hill, Kellyville, Stanhope Gardens and Bella Vista, whilst Sydney Buses and Veolia provide services East and South of Parramatta.

Statistics

The size of Parramatta is approximately 6 km². 

It has 18 parks, 8 schools and 5 childcare centres located in Parramatta.

The population of Parramatta in 2006 was 17,236 people. 
In 2006, 33% of the homes in Parramatta were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $532,500.
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Pemulwuy
Area Profile
Pemulwuy is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Pemulwuy is located 31 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Holroyd.
The real estate in Pemulwuy consists of a combination of quality modern single level homes and two story level homes and units.
History
Pemulwuy is named after the Aboriginal warrior, Pemulwuy, who led attacks on the British troops in the surrounding areas, particularly on the Toongabbie settlement. Pemulwuy is a relatively new suburb, with development beginning in 2004 on the site of an old Boral quarry.
Street names in the suburb include Watkin Tench Parade, named after Captain Watkin Tench, who first saw the Blue Mountains when he stood atop Prospect Hill in 1789.
Transport
The western area is served only by the Westbus 812 bus service running from Blacktown to Fairfield, which must pass through boomgates on the top of the ridge dividing the western and eastern divisions of the suburb. The eastern area is also served by the 810, 810X, 811 and 810X services from Parramatta.
The boomgates on Butu Wargun Drive also mean that those living in the eastern portion, and working in the western must either walk or cycle over the ridge, or drive via the Great Western Highway to the north of the suburb, and Reconciliation Drive.
Statistics

The population of Pemulwuy in 2001 was 627 people.

By 2006 the population in Pemulwuy was 981.

 In 2006, 76% of the real estate homes in Pemulwuy were owner-occupied.

Real estate development in Pemulwuy is considered modern with the majority of homes being two story on smaller parcels of land.

Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of real estate houses in the Pemulwuy area is $585,000.

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Pendle Hill
Area Profile

Pendle Hill is located 30 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Parramatta.
The real estate in Pendle Hill consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
George Bond (1876-1950), an American who came to Australia in 1906, established a cotton spinning mill in the area in 1923. It was Australia's first attempt to spin and weave cotton from cotton farms that the company owned in Queensland. He suggested the suburb be named after Pendleton, south of London, which was the centre of England's cotton industry but a variation, Pendle Hill, was adopted instead. George Bond was originally in the business of importing hosiery and underwear but during World War 1began manufacturing hosiery in Redfern and by 1925 was producing a quarter of Australia's output of hosiery and knitted garments. Bond Industries Limited became a public company in 1927.
The railway station at Pendle Hill opened here on 12 April 1924. The first government school opened in 1955 and the first post office opened in 1956.
Pendle Hill railway station is on the Western railway line of the City Rail network.
Parks

Civic Park is a large park located just west of the railway station. It connects the shopping centre to the suburb of Girraween, and is frequently used as a thoroughfare for pedestrians heading to and from the railway station.
The park has a small river running through one side near the shopping centre, and wildlife can frequently be found on or around the banks of the river. In 2006, the local council undertook a project in which the banks of the river were reinforced and the river was thoroughly cleaned of the rubbish that had gathered in the riverbed.
In the middle of the park, there are four tennis courts and a play equipment area. The latter proves particularly popular with the younger generations, along with feeding the ducks, and the former is frequently used by pensioners for a morning game of tennis.
Binalong Park (also known as Binalong Oval) is a large oval in the north of Pendle Hill bordering Toongabbie. The park contains two tennis courts and three ovals. These both are particularly popular for sporting lessons, and weekend sporting events.
Transport
Pendle Hill railway station is on the Western railway line of the CityRail network and great bus service.
Schools
• Pendle Hill Public School is a primary school
• Pendle Hill High School is a secondary school
Statistics

The size of Pendle Hill is approximately 3 km². 

It has 7 parks, 4 schools and 4 childcare centres.

The population of Pendle Hill in 2006 was 5,897.
In 2006, 50% of the homes in Pendle Hill were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $480,000.

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Prospect
Area Profile

Prospect is located 32 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Blacktown and is part of the Greater Western Sydney region.
The real estate in Prospect consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of newer double and single storey homes.

History

Captain Arthur Phillip called the area 'Bellevue'. In 1789, Captain William Tench climbed to the top of the hill here and gave it the name Tench's Prospect Hill. This was later shortened to Prospect.
Shortly after 1808, William Lawson was appointed aide-de-camp to George Johnston and was granted 500 acres at Prospect, which he named Vereran Hall, and built a 40-room mansion there. He died on the property on June 16 1850 and the property was eventually acquired by the Metropolitan Water Board. The house was demolished in 1926 and most of the property is submerged in what is now Prospect Reservoir.
Sir Joseph Banks is buried on in the cemetery on the hill.

Transport

Prospect is adjacent to the Great Western Highway and the M4 Motorway, providing road access to the western sections of the city and eastward to the Sydney CBD. The Prospect Highway links Prospect to the Hills District.
Nearby Blacktown railway station provides access to the Cityrail and Countrylink networks, especially Cityrails' Western railway line. Several bus companies offer connecting services between Prospect and Blacktown, via Blacktown Road.

Statistics

The size of Prospect is approximately 18 km². 

The population of Prospect in 2006 was 4,304.
In 2006, 81% of the homes in Prospect were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $416,250.

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Rosehill
Area Profile
Rosehill is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Rosehill is located 23 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Parramatta and is part of the Greater Western Sydney region.
Real Estate types are a combination of heritage style character homes or one of the conveniently located home units available for sale or rent in the area.
History
In the early days of the colony, the hill behind old Government House had been named ‘Rose Hill’ by Governor Arthur Phillip, before the suburb had been named Parramatta. Nearly a hundred years later in 1883, 850 acres (3.4 km2) of John Macarthur’s Elizabeth Farm were subdivided for industrial purposes. Part of the estate was set aside for a recreation area, which became Rosehill Racecourse.
A public school opened here in 1886 and the railway station opened in 1888 on the Carlingford line, which was a private railway line until it was taken over by the state government in 1904.
Transport

Rosehill is located only 20 minutes west of the Sydney CBD. It hosts 3 of the city’s major vehicle arteries - Parramatta Road, Victoria Road and the M4 Motorway. The area is well known for the popular Rosehill Race Course.

There is also a primary school in the area, Rosehill Public School and a choice of townhouse & apartment buildings, the heritage listed Elizabeth Farm & many older style homes on large allotments. 

Statistics

The size of Rosehill is approximately 3 km². 

It has 1 park covering nearly 21% of the total area. 

The population of Rosehill in 2006 was 2,170.
 
In 2006, 45% of the homes in Rosehill were owner-occupied.

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Seven Hills
Area Profile

Seven Hills is located 34 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Blacktown.
The real estate in Seven Hills consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
Prior to European settlement in the 1790s, the area now known as Seven Hills was originally settled and occupied for hundreds, if not thousands, of years by indigenous people who most probably would have identified with the Warmuli and Toogagal clans, of the Darug tribe.
The vicinity of Seven Hills was first visited by Europeans very early on in the settlement of the colony of New South Wales, possibly as early as April, 1788 by Arthur Phillip or more certainly by Watkin Tench in June 1789.
Matthew Pearce (1762-1831) was granted 160 acres (53 ha) in 1795, which he named after 'Kings Langley Manor House' in Hertfordshire, England, where he was said to have been born. This area became known as Seven Hills from 1800, because he could see 'seven hills' from his home.
Seven Hills encompassed a much larger area and as late as 1900, landowners as far afield as the modern suburbs of Bella Vista, Glenwood and Parklea identified their properties as being located in Seven Hills. In the 1970s housing schemes excised land that was previously part of Seven Hills to create the suburbs of Lalor Park and Kings Langley.
Transport
The railway from Parramatta to Blacktown station was completed as a single line in 1860. A station master's residence and siding were constructed near a level crossing at what was Toongabbie Road (later Seven Hills Road) in December 1863. A platform was built in 1869, and stops at the station were scheduled in the timetable from September of that year. The road bridge on Seven Hills Road across the railway line was constructed in 1975, replacing the level crossing.
Seven Hills Railway station is on the Western railway line of the City Rail network. Seven Hills is approximately 32 km by rail from Central railway station. Centro Seven Hills is a major Shopping centre in Seven Hills. It was originally opened in 1960 as Seven Hills Regional Shopping Centre.
The M2 Hills Motorway and Westlink M7 are two major arterial roads that link Seven Hills to other parts of Sydney. The Prospect Highway and Seven Hills Road are other major roads in the suburb.

Statistics

The size of Seven Hills is approximately 10 km². 

It has 19 parks, 6 schools and 9 childcare centres.

The population of Seven Hills in 2006 the population was 16,464.
In 2006, 72% of the homes in Seven Hills were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $480,000.

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South Wentworthville
Area Profile
South Wentworthville is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. South Wentworthville is located 28 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Holroyd and is part of the Greater Western Sydney region. South Wentworthville is an extension of Wentworthville.
The real estate in Wentworthville consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of 60s & 70s brick veneer homes, pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

Transport
Although South Wentworthville does not have a railway station it is only a short drive to Wentworthville railway station is on the Western railway line of the City Rail network. The trip to Sydney CBD typically takes 35 minutes.
Buses run to Merrylands, Parramatta, Blacktown and the Hills area, and the Liverpool - Parramatta T-way passes right by the south eastern corner. The North -West T-way will go just along the northern tip (Mons Road).
The M4 Western Motorway and the parallel Great Western Highway run east-west through the southern side. The Cumberland Highway runs through the western side of Wentworthville on its way south (from Hornsby via the Pennant Hills Road to Liverpool).

Statistics

The size of South Wentworthville is approximately 2 km². 

It has 7 parks covering nearly 2% of the total area. 

By 2006 the population was 5,153
In 2006, 64% of the homes in South Wentworthville were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $520,500.

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Toongabbie
Area Profile

Toongabbie is located 30 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district and is located only four kilometres from the Parramatta CBD, Toongabbie is a suburb very much shaped by the 1950s and 60s. Though a new estate was added in the 1970s, it is the architecture of this era that dominates.
The real estate in Toongabbie consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of quality modern double and single storey homes.

History
One of the first places in the Old Sydney colony with an Aboriginal name, Toongabbie meaning "a place near water" or "meeting of the waters" and is an area with much Indigenous and European history. Settlement began here in 1791 when Governor Phillip established a farm on which many convicts were employed. On 1st April 1794, the first grants were recorded as "in the district of Toongabbie" were made. By 1804 it was used only for cattle grazing and as a camp for convicts working in the area. It remained a farming area until pressure from the post war housing boom.
Governor Phillip established a government farm and convict station on 640 acres in 1791 to grow food for the colony. It was supplement to the farms already established at Rose Hill. By December 1791 there were 500 men working at clearing the land. After 11 years, the government farm was closed and the land was given as grants to settlers and convicts who had done their time.
The first school in Toongabbie - Toongabbie Public School, opened on the 3rd of May 1886. By April 1911, the school closed due to low enrolments. The school reopened February the next year and has stayed open ever since. The first post office in the area was opened after many years of campaigning by local residents in 1887 in a private house on Old Windsor Road and this arrangement continued until the 1960s.
In 1908, what was probably the second scout group formed in Australia, 1st Toongabbie Scout Group was organised by Errol Knox. The first scout hall was a barn on his parents' property, "Montargis" in Binalong Road. Later, in 1934, the Group moved to its present location in Bungaree Road on donated land which had also once been part of the Knox landholdings.
The first bank branch in Toongabbie, The Commonwealth Bank, opened in 1957 although bank agencies had operated in the area.
Toongabbie shopping precinct for many years included a small suburban cinema, the "Rocket", located opposite the railway line, next to the overhead road bridge. It operated from sometime between the wars until the early 1970s, when it was closed and demolished and replaced by a row of shops and a small shopping centre and supermarket, the Piccadilly Centre, and bounded by the Toongabbie Hotel and the Catholic Church. This operated until 2004 when the shopping centre and surrounding properties were purchased by a developer for Portico Plaza.
Recently completed Portico Plaza features a Woolworth’s supermarket and several other specialty shops including Australia Post, a newsagency, pharmacy, nail salon, florist and eateries such as Gloria Jeans, Portico Chicken and Akira Sushi. Ample car parking space is provided with over 300 under cover car spots available, free for up to 3 hours. If you don’t have a car, Portico Plaza is two minutes away from bus and train transport.
Transport
Toongabbie railway station is on the Western line of the City Rail network. The original unstaffed station opened on the 26th April, 1880 and was upgraded over the years with additional platforms and loading facilities. The current station was opened in 1946 and the line was electrified in 1955. The railway line and station of Toongabbie sits on the boundary of the Parramatta and Holroyd local government areas. The area's main retail area falls in the Holroyd Council area and is linked by a narrow road bridge.
Toongabbie is also served by private buses with connections to Blacktown via Blacktown Road, Seven Hills via the Prospect Highway, Sydney, and both Parramatta and Westmead via the Great Western Highway.

Statistics

The size of Toongabbie is approximately 5 km². 

It has 14 parks and 5 schools.

The population of Toongabbie in 2006 was 12,728 showing a population.
In 2006, 66% of the homes in Toongabbie were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $450,000.
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Wentworthville
Area Profile

Wentworthville is located 27 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district. Wentworthville is split between the local government areas of the City of Parramatta and the City of Holroyd.
The real estate in Wentworthville consists of a combination of single level homes and two story level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of 60s & 70s brick veneer homes, pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes.

History
Wentworthville and Wentworth Falls, in the Blue Mountains, were named after the Wentworth family. A land grant of 2000 acres (8 km²) in this area was made in 1810 to D’Arcy Wentworth, the father of William Wentworth, the famous Blue Mountains explorer. In the 1800s a land boom in the area attracted people into the area; land was subdivided for housing and small farms. The railway line had been put through on its way to Windsor, in 1864, but it wasn't until 1883 that Wentworthville got its own public railway station.
Recent years have seen considerable growth in the development of upmarket low-rise apartment complexes. Citizens of Western Sydney have flocked to Wentworthville's proximity to shopping, transport, health and other public services.
Major features of the area include Wentworthville Plaza, Wentworthville Shopping Centre, Wentworthville Memorial Swimming Pool, Northside West Clinic, Wentworthville Leagues Club, Ringrose Park, Ernie Quinn Village Green and a number of schools.
Transport
Wentworthville railway station is on the Western railway line of the City Rail network. The trip to Sydney CBD typically takes 35 minutes.
Buses run to Merrylands, Parramatta, Blacktown and the Hills area, and the Liverpool - Parramatta T-way passes right by the south eastern corner. The North -West T-way will go just along the northern tip (Mons Road).
The M4 Western Motorway and the parallel Great Western Highway run east-west through the southern side. The Cumberland Highway runs through the western side of Wentworthville on its way south (from Hornsby via the Pennant Hills Road to Liverpool).

Statistics

The size of Wentworthville is approximately 3 km². 

It has 9 parks, 2 schools and 8 childcare centres.

The population of Wentworthville in 2006 the population was 10,473.
In 2006, 55% of the homes in Wentworthville were owner-occupied compared.
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $720,000.

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Westmead
Area Profile

Westmead is located 26 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Parramatta.
The real estate in Westmead consist of a combination of single level homes, units, single level villas, two story townhouses, combination sites of both villas and townhouses. A combination of pre and post war homes and the area has seen a large number of older homes knocked down and replaced with new larger homes. Also includes a mix of beautiful older weatherboard and full brick homes that have been restored to their former glory.

History
With the British settlement of Parramatta, Westmead was originally part of the domain of Government House. What is left of this domain, including Government House, form Parramatta Park. The name Westmead came into use when the governor's domain was first subdivided in 1859. The subdivision of the domain was completed in 1889.
The Northern Meadow and Western Meadow of the domain were split off and called Northmead and Westmead. From this time orchards were established by many new settlers, including some whose names were well-known in the Parramatta area - George Oakes, Nat Payten and William Fullagar among them.
Parramatta Marist School was established by Fr. John Therry in Hunter Street Parramatta in 1820, under the direction of Mr. George Morley. The school was transferred to the site of the present junior school in 1837 and entrusted to the care of the Marist Brothers in 1875. This makes Parramatta Marist the oldest Catholic school in Australia.
Westmead Hospital is a major 975 bed tertiary hospital in Sydney. Opened in 1978, it is now the major hospital in the Sydney West Area Health Service. It is located on Hawkesbury Road in Westmead, providing a full range of tertiary medical and dental services except for paediatrics which is serviced by the adjacent Children's Hospital at Westmead. It is a teaching hospital of the University of Sydney.
Westmead Hospital is the base for the adult medical retrieval service NRMA Care Flight.
Transport
Westmead railway station is on the Western railway line of the City Rail network. The Western railway line from Parramatta to Blacktown was built through the suburb in 1861. A railway station at Westmead was opened in April of 1893 after a successful petition by local residents.

Statistics

The size of Westmead is approximately 3 km². 

It has 4 parks, 4 schools and 3 childcare centres.

The population of Westmead in 2006 was 11,361.
In 2006, 34% of the homes in Westmead were owner-occupied. 
Currently (Year 2011) the median sale price of houses in the area is $715,000.
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Winston Hills
Area Profile
Winston Hills is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Winston Hills is located 28 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Parramatta and the Greater Western Sydney region. Winston Hills is colloquially known as 'Winsto'.
The real estate in Winston Hills consists of a combination of 60s & 70s brick veneer homes single level homes and two story level homes.
History
Winston Hills was named after Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill (1874–1965) during World War II. In the early days, this area was named Model Farms as this was the area where a model farm was developed to show settlers the types of crops that could be grown in different seasons.
Development of the suburb began in the 1960s, and there is little undeveloped land left. In 2009 the last remaining large parcel of vacant land, at Buckleys Hill, started to be developed. There is not much natural bushland left in the suburb, except for the creek corridors, like Toongabbie Creek. It was transferred from the local government area of the City of Blacktown to the City of Parramatta in 1972.
Some streets are named after great writers such as Bronte Place, Shelley Street, Twain Street and Homer Street which also links to other street names from Greek mythology such as Troy Place, Hera Place, Nestor Street, Ixion Street, Eros Place and Atlas Place. Other group of streets are named after great scientists Einstein, Volta, Lister, Edison and Marconi or Biblical figures such as Goliath, Gideon and Esther.
Commercial area
Winston Hills Mall is a shopping centre that features a Big W discount department store, Woolworths supermarket, Coles supermarket, over 75 specialty shops and a food court. "The Winston" is a pub and restaurant located next to the shopping mall. Further east along Caroline Chisholm Drive is a small shopping centre known as the Chisholm Centre.
Schools
There are two state primary schools, Winston Hills Public School and Winston Heights Public School and a Catholic primary school, St Paul the Apostle in Winston Hills.
Transport

Winston Hills has a great bus service with T-way bus service (from Old Windsor Road) to Parramatta. Also only a short drive to Wentworthville and Toongabbie Railway station.

Statistics

The size of Winston Hills is approximately 4 km². 

It has 12 parks, 2 schools and 1 childcare centre located in Winston Hills.

The population of Winston Hills in 2006 was 11,145. 
In 2006, 84% of the homes in Winston Hills were owner-occupied.
Currently (Year) the median sale price of houses in the area is $605,000.

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